Edtech plays a pivotal role in hybrid learning—and in same cases, the system is more beneficial for students

Earlier this year the United States, just like most countries across the globe, witnessed the life-altering impact of COVID-19 first-hand. In particular, students and educators saw their usual routine completely turned upside down as they were unprepared for the vast impact the virus would have on how students learn and how education settings operate.

Unfortunately, with the majority of children still not back in the classroom and a second wave upon us, it is vital that schools, students, and educators are ready for the further impacts this will have. As part of this, they need to be aware of the options and solutions available to them to ensure teaching and learning can continue as seamlessly as possible, whatever the future holds.

Related content: 3 strategies for hybrid learning

Adopting a hybrid learning system is perhaps the most logical thing to do in many educational settings, as it could prove pivotal in ensuring schools remain able to operate and students remain able to learn in the coming months as COVID and potential lockdown measures continue.

Hybrid learning may not be a perfect solution for everyone, but it is an excellent buffer between the well-known classroom education and the sometimes too-techy virtual one. In a hybrid learning setting, both educators and students get to use a lot more edtech during the school day without completely losing the much-needed face-to-face interaction.

Earlier this year the United States, just like most countries across the globe, witnessed the life-altering impact of COVID-19 first-hand. In particular, students and educators saw their usual routine completely turned upside down as they were unprepared for the vast impact the virus would have on how students learn and how education settings operate.

Unfortunately, with the majority of children still not back in the classroom and a second wave upon us, it is vital that schools, students, and educators are ready for the further impacts this will have. As part of this, they need to be aware of the options and solutions available to them to ensure teaching and learning can continue as seamlessly as possible, whatever the future holds.

Related content: 3 strategies for hybrid learning

Adopting a hybrid learning system is perhaps the most logical thing to do in many educational settings, as it could prove pivotal in ensuring schools remain able to operate and students remain able to learn in the coming months as COVID and potential lockdown measures continue.

Hybrid learning may not be a perfect solution for everyone, but it is an excellent buffer between the well-known classroom education and the sometimes too-techy virtual one. In a hybrid learning setting, both educators and students get to use a lot more edtech during the school day without completely losing the much-needed face-to-face interaction.

Edtech plays a pivotal role in making hybrid learning not only possible, but maybe even better than traditional education.

Here are a few reasons why:

It facilitates differentiated instruction

Every student has a specific academical background, a unique set of interests and learning needs, as well as expectations from what a great learning experience should be. One-on-one instruction is the best way for students to reach their full potential, but it is rarely possible in the classroom, where one educator has to teach several students in a limited time.

When edtech comes into play, specifically through a comprehensive solution that allows teachers to create courses online, assess students and track their progress, and communicate with them through the same platform, things start to get interesting. Educators can tweak the delivery of each lesson, opt for more than one assessment type, and generally get a bird’s eye view of each student’s progress, which allows them to intervene with specific help and personalized recommendations whenever a student struggles with something.

This degree of differentiation, from the content they get, the ongoing support, and the possibility of proving their mastery of a subject in more than one way, helps students perform better academically.

It adds more flexibility to the learning experience

More often than not, the traditional learning experience is based on lectures and presentations given by the teacher and students taking notes on the taught subject. Classroom discussions and group work are often included but don’t always last enough to clarify all issues.

When lectures move online through pre-recorded video lessons, time in the classroom can be spent differently. Students can watch those lessons at their chosen time of day and go through them at their own pace (rewatch some parts, pause the video when things are not entirely clear, etc.) Then, when everyone meets face to face, students will have some prepared questions and will engage in more conversations surrounding the topic.
source: Read More, eSchool News

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