Sometimes, educational experiences are found in the least likely of places--especially during remote learning

Ninety-nine percent of K-12 teachers are facilitating remote instruction. The shift to remote learning has proven to introduce new challenges for both students and educators at all levels. Zoom fatigue, lower engagement (which varies across racial and economic lines), and minimal information retention have created a subpar learning environment that often needs to be supplemented with varying forms of learning outside of the virtual classroom.

One survey found that 67 percent of students’ homework completion rates are worse that before, 75 percent of teachers believe access to technology has been a major obstacle in remote learning, and most teachers are witnessing diminished attendance rates (with some only having 25 percent of their students participate on a daily basis).

Related content: Three critical steps to online learning success

Working parents and teachers alike, desperate to find new solutions to the immense challenge that remote learning has brought upon their daily lives, have turned to creative solutions such as micro-schools, tutoring, and most notably, video games to ensure their children are receiving the best education possible.

Ninety-nine percent of K-12 teachers are facilitating remote instruction. The shift to remote learning has proven to introduce new challenges for both students and educators at all levels. Zoom fatigue, lower engagement (which varies across racial and economic lines), and minimal information retention have created a subpar learning environment that often needs to be supplemented with varying forms of learning outside of the virtual classroom.

One survey found that 67 percent of students’ homework completion rates are worse that before, 75 percent of teachers believe access to technology has been a major obstacle in remote learning, and most teachers are witnessing diminished attendance rates (with some only having 25 percent of their students participate on a daily basis.)

Working parents and teachers alike, desperate to find new solutions to the immense challenge that remote learning has brought upon their daily lives, have turned to creative solutions such as micro-schools, tutoring, and most notably, video games to ensure their children are receiving the best education possible.

The question remains: What strategies or learning formats are best for children to supplement their learning at home? And how can educators best introduce these strategies to their students?

Strategies for remote learning

Most parents won’t become de facto teachers overnight, and while it’s difficult to balance remote education and everyday life, there are outside resources and strategies that parents can incorporate into their children’s daily education. It’s a critical step to ensure successful remote learning as we’ve already seen the decline in completed classwork, engagement, and information retention.

While there’s been some government support, for example California announced its Learning Loss Mitigation Fund awarding $5.3B to California schools, the reality is that supplemental learning has become a requirement for students during this time, this includes:
● Creating a home-learning environment: Creating a designated learning space in the home, as well as a dedicated schedule can be a positive factor in a successful remote learning journey. It also teaches students organization and time-management skills.
● Online tutoring: The online tutoring market has grown by nearly 10 percent in the last year alone due to the impact of remote learning – an efficient resource that many parents have leaned on to supplement their children’s current education.
● Supplemental technology: There are thousands of free apps and websites that can do wonders in filling in the gaps created by remote learning. Whether it’s English, History, or STEM fields parents have found success incorporating myriad tools and resources to help their children learn at home.

Supplementing remote learning with video games

Most would consider video games an antithesis to education, but studies have shown that games provide a 23 percent gain over traditional learning, and that games can be a great addition to language learning specifically.

Video games have been a component to education for years – from the popular Mario Teaches Typing most familiar to millennials’ via grade-school computer class to newer incumbents such as apps designed specifically to teach foreign languages to kids.
source: Read More, eSchool News

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