Districts can affordably create a multiscreen classroom--and it can have a number of benefits in hybrid and remote learning scenarios

Hybrid-remote learning provides the flexibility and freedom schools, parents, and students need in the current pandemic. However, moving a traditional classroom that’s built for face-to-face delivery to a hybrid-remote environment where instructors are teaching to both students in the classroom and online, often simultaneously, will take more than simply a laptop and a video conferencing application. With only these basic tools, remote students may be positioned to fail while teachers are burdened with an unnatural way to teach and a heavier workload. Enter the multiscreen classroom.

In fact, the recent study “Learning and instruction in the hybrid virtual classroom: An investigation of students’ engagement and the effect of quizzes,” published in January by Elsevier, found that both students’ relatedness to peers and intrinsic motivation — both of which are shown to deeply impact academic achievement — work best when multiple screens and collaboration technology is in place.

While it may be hard to imagine a classroom with more than one screen, the success of the hybrid-remote model will depend upon it. Multiple displays enable teachers and students to easily see and engage with each other. To affordably transition to this new model and create a cohesive environment for everyone, schools can rely on the latest budget-friendly display, projector, and presentation solutions designed for education.

The model classroom

In the study, the school employed a classroom setup with the focus on offering all students — whether they were in the classroom or joining online — comparable learning experiences. The setup was also designed to make it more natural and effortless for instructors to teach and engage with students. Remote students were projected on four projector screens at the back of the class, with four students appearing on each screen.

Hybrid-remote learning provides the flexibility and freedom schools, parents, and students need in the current pandemic. However, moving a traditional classroom that’s built for face-to-face delivery to a hybrid-remote environment where instructors are teaching to both students in the classroom and online, often simultaneously, will take more than simply a laptop and a video conferencing application. With only these basic tools, remote students may be positioned to fail while teachers are burdened with an unnatural way to teach and a heavier workload. Enter the multiscreen classroom.

In fact, the recent study “Learning and instruction in the hybrid virtual classroom: An investigation of students’ engagement and the effect of quizzes,” published in January by Elsevier, found that both students’ relatedness to peers and intrinsic motivation — both of which are shown to deeply impact academic achievement — work best when multiple screens and collaboration technology is in place.

While it may be hard to imagine a classroom with more than one screen, the success of the hybrid-remote model will depend upon it. Multiple displays enable teachers and students to easily see and engage with each other. To affordably transition to this new model and create a cohesive environment for everyone, schools can rely on the latest budget-friendly display, projector, and presentation solutions designed for education.

The model classroom

In the study, the school employed a classroom setup with the focus on offering all students — whether they were in the classroom or joining online — comparable learning experiences. The setup was also designed to make it more natural and effortless for instructors to teach and engage with students. Remote students were projected on four projector screens at the back of the class, with four students appearing on each screen.

Rather than a single laptop screen cluttered with tiny, undecipherable faces, each student appears large, almost in human size, on the projector screen. It’s as if they’re sitting right there in class with the rest of the students. Teachers could gauge the reaction and comprehension of every student simply by looking out into the classroom. They never had to stop the flow of the lecture to bend down awkwardly to see and hear online participants from a laptop.

Likewise, cameras were set up to ensure online students could see the teacher clearly at all times. Teachers were able to lecture from the front of the room as well as present digital content seamlessly from an interactive flat panel (IFP). In addition, teachers in the study were given a dashboard that allowed them to screen share, annotate, offer polls and quizzes, and other tools, which encourage interaction and engagement more naturally and spontaneously.

Bolster Remote Learning With These Tips
During Video Conferencing Sessions:
• Do icebreakers or quick interactive activities at the beginning of a session to include remote students and encourage their input and feedback.
• Ask questions regularly as a way to gauge comprehension and attention.
• Use annotation tools and allow each student to contribute.
• Share links to where students can find and read materials to complement the session. Then have students share what they learned.
• Use the IFP’s recording feature to save and archive lectures to the cloud or Canvas for students to review later.
• Facilitate peer relatedness between hybrid and remote students by encouraging breakouts into their own video conferencing sessions. Compile, share, and present notes and presentations.

The study found that technology design choices directly influenced learning in a synchronous hybrid-remote classroom. The multiscreen, highly interactive setup gave staff the means to overcome engagement and comprehension problems that distance can create. As a result, it felt as natural as learning in person.

Going multiscreen for the new normal: How to implement this concept affordably

This study, and many like it over the last decade, have proven that remote learning works best with technology that creates an effortless experience for both teachers and students. While this study used a technology design that spared no expense, a similar setup can be achieved in all classrooms—one that’s not only affordable, but also just as effective. High-quality education solutions have come down in cost in the last two years. What’s more, they’re packed with features specifically engineered and tested to breach any barriers.
source: Read More, eSchool News

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